How come Trump defeated ISIS in months, when Obama couldn’t do it in years?  

President Obama, “after belittling ISIS as a “JV” team and then being surprised by its advances,” predicted that victory in the war against ISIS would take years to achieve — and proceeded to dictate the waging of it in a way that ensured it did.

Obama said, “We must be patient and flexible in our efforts; this is a multiyear fight and there will be challenges along the way.”

But here’s the thing: While President Obama was implementing his tactic of degrading and ultimately destroying ISIS — and, by all accounts, hobbling battlefield commanders in the process — the militant Islamic group was seizing the opportunity thus afforded, and making territorial gains in great big leaps and bounds.

Finally, President Trump took over the reigns as commander in chief and promptly “made several changes in the way the war was fought, the most important of which were to loosen the rules of engagement and give more decision-making authority to battlefield commanders.”

And those changes paid dividends, bringing about the rapid decline of ISIS, as a significant military force.

In a nutshell, what Obama did — again, by all accounts — was micromanage the war, hampering battlefield commanders at practically every turn, as opposed to President Trump giving them free reign to fight the war in the way they knew best.

Which allowed them to achieve victory in next to no time at all, relatively speaking.